NO TIME TO WASTE

NO TIME TO WASTE

The 48 Hour Film Project 2015 (Singapore) 

Written by: Jit Jenn

They say you cannot produce something great that is of last minute work – especially in the industry of filmmaking. Hollywood films on average can be in the making from 6 months to up to two years!  

Tiefland – a film produced by German filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl, was listed as the feature film with the longest production time in history, with 31 years of production from 1964 to 1995.  

Filmmaking is a tedious process for any production crew. Intricate planning and execution is needed to produce, write, film and edit their vision for the big screen.  

Imagine how you would feel if you are put into a position where you are supposed to do all of that in just 48 hours?  

The 48 Hour Film Project is a contest whereby teams of filmmakers have just 48 hours to create a short film with an assigned genre, character, prop and a line of dialogue.  

After 48 hours of filmmaking, the films from each city are screened and then judged by a jury, usually made out of the city’s esteemed filmmakers and actors.  

Winners of each film in their respective city will be shown at “Filmapalooza” – the finale festival for the 48 hours Film Project.  

The top 10 films from “Filmapalooza” will then be screened at one of the most prestigious film festival in the world, The Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, France.  

This competition definitely challenges filmmakers to be spontaneous, creative and most importantly has good time management.  

 

The Experience  

Entering the 48 Hour Film Project with only a set of ideas for the film and a confirmed location. (Which was at one of our crew’s houses) 

We had plenty of fun during the entire production duration. With luck on our side, we managed to get a genre that we all liked (dark comedy) and avoided the dreaded and unholy ‘Western and Musical’ genre.  

(We caught ourselves heaving sign of reliefs and celebrating when we found out that the team before us got the dreaded genre, thus allowing us to avoid the genre completely to the dismay of our unlucky competitor. I was surprised we didn’t get punch for our jubilation.) 

The competition was definitely a tough challenge. We had to script and film within the first 24 hours in order to have time to edit during the final 24 hours. After the briefing, we immediately went back to ideate on our story before sleeping to prepare for a whole day of filming. 

We started filming on Saturday and wrapped up in just a mere five hours. I felt that our teamwork and coordination has helped us both effectively and efficiently during the shoot. We edited from Saturday night to Sunday afternoon, and finally submitted the film at 7pm.  

To our surprise, out of 42 teams, which participated we were one of the first few teams to submit their films.  

During the screenings of our short film, we were thrilled with the audience’s reactions to our dark comedy. The cherry on top being when we found out we were nominated for a ‘Best Directing’ prize.  

Although we didn’t win the prize, we were excited to be nominated for something.  

All in all, the 48 Hour Film Project experience was both enjoyable, a lot of fun and no doubt one of the most interesting productions I have done this year. I highly recommend aspiring filmmakers and film enthusiast to take part in this awesome competition. 

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